National Negro Opera Company

Preservationists are working to save the grand old Victorian home on Apple Street in Pittsburgh's Homewood neighborhood - and for good reason. It was the birthplace of Mary Cardwell Dawson's National Negro Opera Company which launched careers and opened doors. Nicknamed "Mystery Manor," the house also hosted famous African-American entertainers, athletes and business people who were denied hotel rooms when visiting Pittsburgh. This Emmy winning report showcases Madame Dawson's Opera Company, the now-dilapidated home's glorious history and the efforts to preserve it. Writer/Producer: David Solomon. Camera/Editing: Frank Caloiero.

Program Type 
Documentary
Short Feature
Music/Performance

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