An event at the Heinz History Center that honored the Tuskegee Airmen of Western Pennsylvania, as well as Leroy W. Homer, co-pilot of the ill-fated United Flight 93.


OnQ is going green - as correspondent Tonia Caruso gives you ten simple tips to make your home healthier and more environmentally friendly.


What does your handwriting reveal about you? More than you think. In tonight's cover story Tonia Caruso talks to local handwriting expert Michelle Dresbold.


OnQ's Michael Bartley reports on this five-year, $100 million dollar program which will address five critical children's health issues - nutrition, physical activity, self-esteem, grieving and bullying.


OnQ examines why Pittsburgh is such a popular destination for Indian immigrants. Michael Bartley takes you inside the historic Sri Venkateswara Temple in Penn Hills and introduces an Indian-American businessman who continues to attract immigrants and Indian business to this region.


You may know the name John Brashear but do you know how this local man changed history and the world of astronomy. OnQ's Tonia Caruso profiles the great educator and his accomplishments.


It started in 1936 with two paintings, but now the art collection at Greater Latrobe Senior High School numbers in the hundreds. On Q Correspondent, Michael Bartley, takes you on a visual tour of original artworks chosen and purchased by students.


A new, innovative brain surgery at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh can pinpoint the microscopic-sized area of the brain causing epileptic seizures in children. OnQ's Michael Bartley hosts a discussion with Children's Hospital physicians, Dr. Deborah Holder and Dr. Elizabeth Tyler-Kabara.


Many people think of midwifery as a thing of the past. But more and more women are opting to have their babies the natural way.  OnQ visits the Midwife Center in Pittsburgh's Strip District.


Preservationists are working to save the grand old Victorian home on Apple Street in Pittsburgh's Homewood neighborhood - and for good reason. It was the birthplace of Mary Cardwell Dawson's National Negro Opera Company which launched careers and opened doors. Nicknamed "Mystery Manor," the house also hosted famous African-American entertainers, athletes and business people who were denied hotel rooms when visiting Pittsburgh. OnQ reports on Madame Dawson's Opera Company, the now-dilapidated home's glorious history and the efforts to preserve it.

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