Non-Lethal Weapons

The U.S. military is finding alternatives to using deadly force around the world. It's called non-lethal weapons training, and many service men and women are being trained by the experts at the Penn State Fayette campus in Uniontown. OnQ's Michael Bartley takes you there.


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These 80 acres in Upper St. Clair and South Fayette have seen their share of human use and abuse. But Wingfield Pines is now home to abundant wildlife, trails, and most importantly a natural filtering system that is helping restore Chartiers Creek. OnQ shows how this Allegheny Land Trust project is transforming ugly orange mine discharge into pristine water, giving new life to a local water shed.


One of many businesses that opted to stay as others moved out. OnQ introduces the owner and showcases her beautiful collection of Ethiopian art and crafts.


Groundbreaking work continues at this University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute facility. OnQ's Tonia Caruso reports on how researchers are learning more about the connections between the environment and cancer.


OnQ's Tonia Caruso introduces viewers to Hosea Holder, a Pittsburgh area swim coach whose strong philosophy of dedication, commitment and hard work has created successful competitive swimmers for more than forty years. You can reach Coach Holder by e-mail at ndownes123@earthlink.net or by phone at 412-521-4503.


There's an international appeal to re-enacting medieval times. The Society for Creative Anachronism has hundreds of thousands of members. OnQ visits the Pittsburgh chapter, which is one of the nation's most popular.


Through the Center for Minority Health, minister Rev. Vaughn teaches African dance classes for the CMH's Healthy Black Family Project at the Kingsley Center's newly-renovated exercise studios. Class participants talk with OnQ's Chris Moore about getting a handle on health, as well as spiritual issues.


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