National Negro Opera Company

Preservationists are working to save the grand old Victorian home on Apple Street in Pittsburgh's Homewood neighborhood - and for good reason. It was the birthplace of Mary Cardwell Dawson's National Negro Opera Company which launched careers and opened doors. Nicknamed "Mystery Manor," the house also hosted famous African-American entertainers, athletes and business people who were denied hotel rooms when visiting Pittsburgh. This Emmy winning report showcases Madame Dawson's Opera Company, the now-dilapidated home's glorious history and the efforts to preserve it. Writer/Producer: David Solomon. Camera/Editing: Frank Caloiero.


View more from WQED

Series: OnQ

Medical information is complicated enough, but some patients must also deal with language barriers or disabilities. OnQ explores how hospitals, providers and other organizations are addressing this health care disparities problem.


Think your house is cold and drafty? Tonight, OnQ offers some help. Local professionals explain how to best winterize your home and lower your heating bills. You might be surprised by some of the things you'll learn.


In 2005, OnQ followed researchers fishing local rivers to determine if cancer-causing contaminants are seeping into the rivers and into our tap water. In this 2007 follow-up report, Michael Bartley has the startling results of the major study.


This half-hour episode focuses on the ongoing transformation of Pittsburgh's Garfield neighborhood with the help of community leaders, businesses and neighbors who care. 


He spent more than a month at the National Aviary recovering from a terrible wound. Now, this eastern golden eagle may help local researchers to save thousands of other birds. OnQ correspondent Tonia Caruso explains how and why.


How will America's new leadership handle the health insurance challenges? How will consumers be affected? How should the public position itself in the meantime?


Pages