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Stem Video Challenge

2012 National STEM Video Game Challenge

About the 2012 National Stem Video Game Challenge

Congratulations to Pittsburgh's own Campbell Kriess, Connor Schexnaildre, Justin Bicehouse and Drew McCarron for their winning game, Archers vs. Aliens.

Additional footage in this video was taken at WQED's Mini Global Game Jam in January, 2012.


See more of Archers and Aliens here and all the 2012 winners here.



The 2012 National STEM Video Game Challenge will award prizes to middle school students (5th-8th grade), high school students, college students (undergraduate and graduate), and educators for coming up with the best STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) video games using a variety of free game-making platforms. The Challenge launches on November 15, 2011 and closes on March 12, 2012; winners will be announced in the summer of 2012. The Challenge is being launched in partnership with the Digital Promise, a new initiative created by the President and Congress, supported through the U.S. Department of Education. The implementing partners for the challenge are the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop and E-Line Media. Learn more about the national contest online.


Game ON! Watch our workshop in action in "Learning Through Play," an episode of WQED's Pittsburgh 360°.

We Jammed!


PBS KIDS, in partnership with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), is also participating in the 2012 National STEM Video Game Challenge. Individuals who wish to produce games as part of the PBS KIDS stream are encouraged to develop games for children ages 4-8 that focus on early math skills. Learn more here!

National Prize Categories

The Middle School Category aims to motivate and engage middle school students (grades 5 through 8) in STEM learning, 21st century literacy skills and systems thinking by challenging them to design original video games.

The High School Category aims to motivate and engage high school students (grades 9 through 12) in STEM learning, 21st century literacy skills and systems thinking by challenging them to design original video games.

The Collegiate Category challenges emerging game developers at the graduate and undergraduate levels to design video games for children (pre-K through grade 12) that teach key STEM concepts and foster an interest in STEM subject areas.

The Educator Category challenges educators, youth development professionals, as well as afterschool mentors to design video games for children (pre-K through grade 8) that teach key STEM concepts and foster an interest in STEM subject areas.



The CPB-PBS KIDS Ready To Learn initiative is joining Microsoft Xbox 360, AMD Foundation, and the Entertainment Software Association as sponsors of the 2012 National STEM Video Game Challenge. National outreach partners for The Challenge include Boys & Girls Clubs of America, Girl Scouts of America, American Library Association, American Association of School Librarians, the George Lucas Education Foundation, One Economy, International Game Developers Association and BrainPOP.

partnerships