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This Month’s Learning Innovation: Message From Me

“Children today, we call them digital natives. They’re born to be able to pick up the iPad because it’s just part of their world,” according to Sue Polojac, the director of programming for PAEYC, the Pittsburgh Association for the Education of Young Children.

Even the youngest children can easily master an iPad or simple digital device. But how can that help them educationally and in learning to be better communicators?

“About five years ago, one of our funders challenged us to come up with something for young children,” says Emily Hamner, senior research associate of the CREATE Lab at Carnegie Mellon University. If anyone could create something to meld education and technology, it’s the CREATE Lab, a place where researchers, engineers, designers, psychologists, educators and artists work together to develop socially meaningful innovation and technologies.

“Most technology is aimed at older children,” Emily continues. And, she explains, at that time the CREATE Lab wasn’t even sure if young children should be gaining access to technology. CREATE director Illa Nourbakhsh wasn’t convinced until a personal incident changed his mind.

“Illa’s mother-in-law works with an early childhood community. She told him that the connection between what happens at school and at home isn’t really consistent.” Imagine asking your three-year-old to relate what happened at their Early Childhood Center that day… So CREATE decided to figure out a way for children to communicate with their parents.

Emily led the team that developed “Message from Me.” These are simple kiosks at childcare centers that enable young children to record their daily experiences by using cameras and iPads to take pictures, microphones to record a message and email to send them to their parents. This allows young children to practice their communication skills and build their self-confidence by talking about their day.

It was tested out at the Children’s School of CMU. Then PAEYC stepped in. They wanted to partner with the CREATE Lab to get these kiosks in centers throughout Southwestern Pennsylvania. With funding from PNC and their Grow Up Great program and the Grable Foundation, PAEYC began placing the kiosks throughout Allegheny and Westmoreland County. Over 2000 youngsters are participating, in family childcare centers, Pittsburgh Public Schools, AIU3 Head Start programs, nearly 100 classrooms and centers serving low to moderate income children, ages three to five.

“It’s changing communication between the home and school,” says Sue.

Message From Me - CMU CREATE Lab
Message From Me

Other Resources:
Pittsburgh Association for the Education of Young Children

The Wonder of Learning Opens at The Convention Center

How do children think? How do they learn? How can educators tap into a child’s personal interests to spark creativity and learning? “The Wonder of Learning: The Hundred Languages of Children” explores this in a comprehensive and exciting exhibit on display at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center now through November. It opened last month with a reception attended by local leaders and educators.

The Wonder of Learning showcases the Reggio Emilia Approach, which evolved in the city of Reggio Emilia, Italy, after World War II. It allows children to learn by following their personal interests, using collaboration and relationship based learning. The exhibit showcases how children react to materials, writing, nature, ideas and more from their earliest years on.

This exhibit has traveled to 31 countries, including 40 cities in the US. It includes stations with media, objects, videos, the children’s work, and “The Atelier of Light,” an interactive exhibit for children ages 5-8 which allows visitors to experiment with different aspects of light.

Local hosts for the exhibit are The Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Association for the Education of Young Children (PAEYC), with Carolyn Linder and Sue Polojac leading a steering committee that included top local educators. The exhibit is free and open to the public Wednesday through Friday from 1 to 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For information: www.pittsburghwol.org

Photos



Dr. Edwina Kinchington from Pittsburgh Science & Technology Academy (SciTech) recently won the 2015 Pennsylvania Outstanding Biology Teacher Award from The National Association of Biology Teachers.



Young learners experiment with casting chocolate in molds in an activity at Allegheny Traditional Academy presented by Assemble.



A recent Maker Education Meet-Up presented by The Sprout Fund was held at CMU’s Hunt Library. Hosts were IDeAte, the Integrative Design, Arts and Technology Network at CMU.



Emily Simmons animates upcoming MAKER dates during a meeting at CMU’s Hunt Library, hosted by IDeAte and the Sprout Fund. Educators learned about CMU’s efforts in physical computing, learning and making.



Superheroes love science, technology, art and math, and learn all about these “powers” during Assemble’s Summer Camp session, Superheroes Assemble!



Some lucky kids became “Urban Eco Explorers” this summer at Assemble’s camp session that explored the environment, science, ecology and renewable energy.



Deadline is still open for Makers to participate in Maker Faire Pittsburgh, set for October 10 and 11 on the NorthSide. Makerfairepittsburgh.com/makers.



TechShop Director of Education Louise Larson, left, takes a turn at making buttons at the TechShop’s recent “21+Night.”



TechShop recently held a “21+Night,” with proceeds benefiting Big Brothers and Big Sisters. Hundreds attended and spent the night “Making” and acquainting themselves with the facility.



Anthony Klimko of Turtle Creek has been working as an intern at the Allegheny Intermediate Unit through the Three Rivers Workforce Investment Board. He intends to major in Early Childhood Education with a minor in Special Education.

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