Archive for the 'Water and Shore' Category

Nov 24 2014

Avoiding The Storm

Red-breasted mergansers (photo by Shawn Collins)

While seven feet of snow fell on parts Buffalo, New York last week, the birds on Lake Erie did their best to avoid the storm.  Because they can fly, it wasn’t hard to do.

The lake effect storm was so localized that it hammered communities south of Buffalo but barely snowed Downtown.  On November 18 Alfonzo Cutaia recorded the amazing wall of white picking up moisture from the lake and carrying it away from Downtown Buffalo.

 

That night it snowed three inches at Presque Isle State Park in Erie, PA but conditions had improved by the next morning.  Jerry McWilliams described the scene at Sunset Point: “The severe winter storm that was hitting the Buffalo area continued out over the lake until at least 0800 hours [with] heavy storm clouds and whiteout conditions about a mile out on the lake. This may have been the reason for a massive movement of waterfowl this morning, especially Red-breasted Merganser.  Except for Redheads which were mainly moving east, most ducks were moving west.”

Jerry counted 11,400 red-breasted mergansers flying away from the storm.

The ducks escaped but I can only wonder what happened to the songbirds.  I hope they left on Tuesday during the first break in the three-day storm.

And now, as if the snow wasn’t enough, Buffalo has rain, snowmelt, floods and high winds today.

Fly away!

 

(photo of red-breasted mergansers by Shawn Collins)

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Nov 15 2014

Swans On The Move

Tundra swan flock in migration (photo by Steve Gosser)

Tundra swans are migrating now over western Pennsylvania.  They’re traveling 3,600 miles from Canada’s Northwest Territory and Alaska’s North Slope to Chesapeake Bay and eastern North Carolina.

Steve Gosser photographed this flock on November 12.  I saw 60 at Moraine State Park on November 13.

The flocks are composed of families: mother, father and one or two youngsters.  In the fall their trip takes about 12 weeks, a slower pace than their springtime return because their “kids” are young and need to rest longer.

Sometimes they’re hard to see.  On an overcast day they’re white birds in a white sky so listen for their voices and look up.

Do you know their call?  Click here to hear.  Start the player at the 6:00 minute mark to hear a flock approach and land at Pungo Lake, North Carolina.

Tundra swans are on the move.

 

(photo by Steve Gosser)

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Oct 10 2014

Click On Every Penguin

Penguin Watch: count the penguins (image from Zooniverse Penguin Watch)

Are you hooked on penguins? Would you like to see more of them from the comfort of your home?

Check out the new online citizen science project, Penguin Watch, where you can view more than 175,000 photos of Antarctic penguins, chicks and eggs.

Because penguins are declining, scientists are monitoring them using remote cameras.  The cameras have taken a lot of pictures — so many that the task of counting the penguins and their breeding success is impossible for the few scientists involved.  That’s where citizen science comes in.

Zooniverse put the photos online and made an easy tool for counting the penguins.  Look at the photo.  Click on every penguin. Done!  The clicks become a crowd-sourced map of Antarctica’s penguins.

It doesn’t matter if you make mistakes because crowd-sourcing smooths out the errors. You can even chat about the images with other volunteers and the researchers at Penguin Watch Talk.

Help scientists understand why penguin populations are declining and how to protect them by visiting www.penguinwatch.org or these links on Facebook and Twitter.

Look at the photos.  Click on every penguin.  That’s all you have to do.

 

(remote camera photo of penguins in Antarctica from Zooniverse Penguin Watch.  How many do you see?)

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Oct 08 2014

Gallinule On Steroids

Purple swamp Hen at Wollongong botanic gardens (photo by Toby Hudson)

Have you ever seen this bird?

It resembles a purple gallinule (Porphyrio martinicus) but it’s the size of a chicken with darker plumage and scary-looking feet.  It looks like a gallinule on steroids.

This is, in fact, a purple swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio), native to Africa, tropical Asia, Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand, but you don’t have to travel that far to see one.

I learned in an ABA article by Bill Pranty that purple swamphens mysteriously appeared at the Silverlakes development in Pembroke Pines, Florida in 1996.  Some speculated that the birds had escaped from Miami MetroZoo during Hurricane Andrew four years earlier, but the zoo hadn’t lost any swamphens.  Closer inspection revealed that two breeders a quarter mile from Silverlakes had allowed their purple swamphens to roam free.  Naturally some of the swamphens didn’t come home.

By October 2006 purple swamphens were so prolific that Florida’s wildlife managers decided to eradicate them, but more than two years of shooting had no effect.  The swamphens continued to expand their range.  The failed eradication program ended in December 2008.

The first time I ever saw a purple swamphen was last December at Green Cay Wetlands in Boynton Beach, Florida, about 40 air-miles from their original release point.  I’ve birded in Palm Beach County numerous times since the swamphen’s release — especially at Wakodahatchee Wetlands where they appeared in 2000 — but it took 20 years for me to see one.

Though the bird was added to the official ABA Checklist in February 2013, their reputation is tarnished.  When I pointed out my new Life Bird to another birder standing nearby she said, “They aren’t a good thing to see.”

Read about the purple swamphen’s history, the unsuccessful attempt to eradicate them, and their expansion in Florida in this article by Bill Pranty.

 

(photo from Australia via from Wikimedia Commons. Click on the image to see the original)

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Sep 09 2014

Taking A ShortCut

Published by under Water and Shore

Sabine's gull at Pymatuning Spillway, 5 Sep 2014 (photo by Shawn Collins)

A rare gull showed up at the Pymatuning spillway last Friday in Crawford County, Pennsylvania.  Thanks to Mark Vass’s report and the gull’s three day stopover, many birders saw this beautiful Sabine’s gull.

Named for Edward Sabine(*) who first noted the bird in Greenland in 1818, adults in breeding plumage are easy to identify with dark gray hoods, yellow-tipped black bills, notched tails, and triangles of black-white-gray on their upper wings.  As you can see in Shawn Collins’ photos, this one is an adult.

Sabine's gull at Pymatuning Spillway, 5 Sep 2014 (photo by Shawn Collins)

What a cooperative bird!

Sabine's gull at Pymatuning Spillway, 5 Sep 2014 (photo by Shawn Collins)

Sabine’s gulls breed on the tundra at the top of the world in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Scandinavia and Russia.  Their breeding and dietary habits are so unusual that they’re alone in their genus: Xema sabini.  They call, fly, and court like terns.  Their chicks fledge before fully feathered like terns, but are precocial like shorebirds.  In the Arctic, adults and juveniles feed on the mudflats like shorebirds yet they live on the open ocean most of their lives.

As soon as breeding is over Sabine’s gulls leave for the southern hemisphere, covering 7,500 to 9,000 miles as they make their way to coastal upwelling currents near South America and Southern Africa.  Most migrate offshore, especially the juveniles, but a few cross the continent.  In North America the western group winters at the Pacific’s Humboldt Current while those who breed in eastern Canada and Greenland cross the Atlantic to winter at the Benguela Current near the southern coast of Africa.

Though unusual, this bird was not off course.  He knows the Humboldt Current is due south of Hudson Bay.  He was taking a shortcut.

 

(photos by Shawn Collins)

* Sabine is pronounced “SAB ine” where SAB rhymes with “cab” and “ine” rhymes with “wine.” For a complete (and light-hearted) list of bird-name pronunciations see Kevin McGowan’s list here.

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Aug 24 2014

A One Day Wonder

Red-necked phalarope at Conneaut Harbor (photo by Steve Gosser)

Pittsburgh birders always hope that a trip to Lake Erie’s shore will uncover a rarity.  Will there be something awesome at the end of that 2.5 hour drive?

This rare bird showed up at Conneaut, Ohio nine days ago.  The August 15 rare bird alert reported an immature red-necked phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) on the sand spit.  Birders flocked to see him so far from his species’ normal migration routes west of the Mississippi and offshore in the Atlantic.

Steve Gosser photographed him less than 24 hours later.   Isn’t he gorgeous!

Red-necked phalarope at Conneaut Harbor, 16 Aug 2014 (photo by Steve Gosser)

That was Saturday.  I drove to Conneaut on Sunday and the bird was gone.

I should be more nimble if I want to see these One Day Wonders.

 

(photos by Steve Gosser)

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Aug 08 2014

Barnacles Have Arms

Published by under Water and Shore

Barnacles in a Maine tidal pool (photo by Kate St. John)

August is beach month, so if you’re heading for the ocean here’s something to look for while you’re there.

Stop by a pier, check out a jetty or gaze into rocky tidal pools to find submerged barnacles.

When you find them watch carefully and you’ll see how they feed.  From the “mouth” at the top of the shell they extend their cirri to comb the water for food.

Click on the screenshot above to watch a quick movie of Semibalanus balanoides barnacles feeding in Greenland’s clear seawater.  This species is the only intertidal barnacle you’ll find on North America’s north-east coast.  It occurs as far south as Cape Hatteras.

Check out the barnacles.  They have “arms” and they’re waving.

 

(barnacles photo by Kate St. John)

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Jul 29 2014

Even Less Water Than We Thought

Colorado River water loss as seen at Lake Mead, Nevada (photo from US Bureau of Reclamation)

Rainfall in Pittsburgh is normal this year but out West they’re in their 14th year of drought with no end in sight.  This is starkly obvious at Lake Mead near Las Vegas where the water level has dropped 138 feet, leaving a “bathtub ring” of mineral deposits.

Three western states depend on Lake Mead for water and on its dam for electricity.  Since last October 4.2 million acre feet came into the lake but 7.9 million was withdrawn.  The lake has dropped 30 feet in the past five months alone.  As the water drops so does Hoover Dam’s generating capacity, putting the electric supply at risk too.

You’d think this problem could be fixed by controlling surface water consumption but it goes much deeper than that.

Back in January, I wrote about NASA’s GRACE satellite pair that measures groundwater from outer space (click here to read how it works).  Using nine years of GRACE data from the Colorado River Basin, University of California Irvine and NASA scientists made an alarming discovery.  From December 2004 to November 2013 the watershed lost 53 million acre-feet of water, an amount almost twice the size of Lake Mead.  More than 75% of that loss was from groundwater.  No one knows how much water is underground but it’s going fast.

When wells deplete groundwater, there are significant downstream consequences.  A 2012 study by Stanford Woods Institute found that overpumping can make the surface run dry.  Though surface water is carefully managed in the West, groundwater use is often poorly documented and barely managed — if at all.

Water loss at this scale affects every living thing.  Near Las Vegas the wetlands along Lake Mead are gone and so are the birds and animals that depended on them.

If the loss continues at this rate, humans may have to leave Las Vegas, too.

 

Read more about this study in Science Daily.

(photo of Lake Mead by U.S. Bureau of Reclamation)

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Jul 27 2014

It’s Shorebird Time!

Published by under Water and Shore

American avocet, July 2014 (photo by Jessica Botzan)

After the summer solstice, shorebirds begin to migrate from their northern breeding grounds.

By early July the first wave reaches Lake Erie’s shore and our inland ponds and rivers.  This early group includes colorful adults still in breeding plumage.

Jessica Botzan photographed this gorgeous American avocet at Conneaut, Ohio last weekend.

It’s shorebird time!

 

(photo by Jessica Botzan)

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Jun 25 2014

Til Death Do Us Part

One of a pair of snow geese at Martin's Creek PP&L, June 2014 (photo by Jon Mularczyk)

In this month of wedding vows …

Jon Mularczyk confirmed that there are still four snow geese at the Martin’s Creek PP&L lands in Northampton County.  This species is quite unusual in Pennsylvania in June.

All the other five million snow geese are nesting at their arctic breeding grounds right now and their eggs are about to hatch.  The four geese near Bangor, PA should have left months ago.

Why are they still here?  Because they mate for life.

When snow geese are two years old they choose a mate … forever.  Their pair bond is so strong and so permanent that they will never abandon each other as long as they live.  The bird pictured above is able-bodied and could fly to the arctic but his mate, below, has a broken wing.  He won’t leave without her.
Snow goose with broken wing at Martin's Creek PP&L, June 2014 (photo by Jon Mularczyk)

The other two geese are probably their one-year old “kids.”  Young snow geese stay with their parents during their first round-trip migration so if Mom and Dad get stuck in Pennsylvania the kids stay, too.  Family ties are important.

Humans could learn a lot from snow geese.

Til death do us part.

 

(photos by Jon Mularczyk, Broad-Winged Photography)

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