Archive for the 'Travel' Category

Jan 29 2015

Finch Or Tanager?

Published by under Travel

Lesser Antillean bullfinch at St John, USVI (photo by Dick Daniels from Wikimedia Commons)

When English-speaking settlers first saw the North American robin they named it for a bird they knew in Europe.  This happened despite the fact that the two robins are unrelated.  The European robin is an Old World flycatcher (Muscicapidae).  The American robin is a Thrush (Turdidae).

A similar confusion occurred with the Lesser Antillean bullfinch (Loxigilla noctis).

Native to the arc of islands from Puerto Rico to South America, the beak on this bird resembles that of the Eurasian bullfinch and so he was named.  But the Eurasian bullfinch is a True Finch (Fringillidae).  The Lesser Antillean bullfinch is a Tanager (Thraupidae).

And now the Tanager family is in flux.  Our familiar tanagers (scarlet, summer and western) have been moved to the Cardinal family (Cardinalidae) while euphonias and chlorophonias left Tanagers to become True Finches.

This bird remains a Tanager but he was joined by a very famous set of birds: Darwin’s finches of the Galapagos.

I’ve already seen and heard this bird at St. John and guess what… His song resembles a northern cardinal’s.

 

(photo from Wikimedia Commons taken at St. John, US Virgin Islands by Dick Daniels. Click on the image to see the original)

 

p.s. I’ve written and pre-scheduled this week’s blogs ahead of time because Internet access is spotty where I’m staying at St. John, USVI.  I might not post/respond to your comments this week but I’ll be very active online next weekend!

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Jan 28 2015

Incredible Site Fidelity

Published by under Migration,Travel

Whimbrel ready for release in migration tracking study (photo by Barry Truitt, courtesy Center for Conservation Biology via William&Mary news)

Whimbrel ready about to be released for migration tracking study (photo by Barry Truitt, courtesy the Center for Conservation Biology)

The U.S. Virgin Islands are so beautiful it’s no wonder people come here every winter, year after year.  Some birds do too, and they show incredible site fidelity even in their choice of rest stops along the way.

Whimbrels are large shorebirds with long decurved bills who breed on the marshy tundra of Alaska, Northwest Canada and Hudson Bay.(*)  Their breeding season is short so they make 14,000 mile annual migrations to spend most of the year in Brazil or the Caribbean.  On migration they often use the same favored stopovers on the U.S. coast.  That’s how one particular whimbrel nicknamed Hope encountered biologists from William & Mary’s Center for Conservation Biology (CCB) in May 2009.

Since 2007 CCB had been tracking shorebird migration by fitting whimbrels with satellite backpacks at their staging areas on the Delmarva peninsula.  The satellite data, mapped by CCB and The Nature Conservancy, provided astonishing results.  For instance, from 2009 to 2011 Hope traveled faithfully from the Mackenzie River Delta to Great Pond at St.Croix, nearly always stopping at Delmarva along the way.

Migration journeys of Hope the Whimbrel, 2009 to 2011 (map from Center for Conservation Biology and The Nature Conservancy, courtesy Center for Conservation Biology)

Migration journeys of Hope the Whimbrel, 2009 to 2011 (map courtesy of the Center for Conservation Biology)

Her amazing migration made news at Audubon Magazine and EarthSky.org, and became a conservation story in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

In 2012 shortly after returning to St. Croix, Hope’s satellite antenna broke, rendering the tracking unit useless.  Rather than replace the unit, CCB decided to remove it and put colorful tags on her legs so that local birders could recognize her.  Here, Fletcher Smith holds her one last time before releasing her at Great Pond.

Fletcher Smith about to release Hope in St. Croix after removing her damaged satellite backpack, 2012 (photo courtesy the Center for Conservation Biology)

Fletcher Smith about to release Hope in St. Croix after removing her damaged satellite backpack, 2012 (photo courtesy of the Center for Conservation Biology)

 

Hope retired from the tracking program but she didn’t stop her normal life.  True to her habits, she still makes her faithful journey. In August 2013 she was photographed at St. Croix having completed her first round trip to Canada without the backpack.  Here she is sporting her yellow and green leg tags at Great Pond.  She’s there this winter, too.

Hope returns to Great Pond at St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, August 2013 (photo from the Center for Conservation Biology)

Hope returns to Great Pond at St. Croix, August 2013 (photo courtesy of the Center for Conservation Biology)

We humans may visit the same places every year but for truly incredible site fidelity follow a whimbrel.

Read more about CCB’s Center for Conservation Biology shorebird tracking program and watch cool videos of the Mackenzie Delta and a whimbrel with chick here at the Center for Conservation Biology.

 

(photos and map courtesy of the Center for Conservation Biology)

And … three more messages:

1. Though I’m visiting St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands I will not be going to St. Croix to see “Hope.”  St. Croix is 43 miles south of St. John and there is no longer any ferry service. Like a whimbrel, you have to fly.

2. (*) These breeding and migration ranges refer to the Atlantic-migration whimbrels of North America.  Whimbrels have a worldwide distribution.

3. I’ve written and pre-scheduled this week’s blogs ahead of time because Internet access is spotty where I’m staying at St. John, USVI.  I might not post/respond to your comments this week but I’ll be very active online next weekend!

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Jan 27 2015

How Brown Is A Booby?

Published by under Travel,Water and Shore

Juvenile brown booby in flight (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

When a brown booby shows up in the northeastern U.S. it’s usually late in the year (August to December) and the bird is usually quite brown.  That’s because juvenile birds like this one are more prone to wandering from their tropical ocean homes than are their parents.

Having never seen a brown booby (Sula leucogaster) until this week at St. John, USVI my exposure was limited to a few photos of juvenile birds from Pennsylvania rare bird alerts.  For years I assumed that brown boobies were 100% brown.  Not!

Adults are crisp brown-and-white and even have white faces that acquire color in the breeding season.

Here’s a typical adult brown booby.  Quite a different-looking bird!

Adult brown booby in flight (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

Since I’m used to seabirds in Maine I think it’s very cool that brown boobies so closely resemble northern gannets (Morus bassanus) in size, shape, and plunge-dive feeding strategy.

Northern Gannet (photo by Chuck Tague)

Fortunately they’re brown enough that you don’t misidentify them as gannets when you see them on the northern ocean.

 

Note: Brown boobies are very common tropical ocean birds but their population is declining in the Caribbean because of encroachment and invasive mammals on their nesting islands.  They made the State Of The Birds Watch List in 2014 because they’ve declined so much.

(brown booby photos from Wikimedia Commons. Click on the images to see the originals.  Northern gannet photo by Chuck Tague)

 

p.s. I’ve written and pre-scheduled this week’s blogs ahead of time because Internet access is spotty where I’m staying at St. John, USVI.  I might not post/respond to your comments this week but I’ll be very active online next weekend!

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Jan 26 2015

First Bird On The Agenda

Banaquits arguing in Brazil (photo from Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons license)

The first bird on my St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands agenda is the bananaquit. For me, it’s a Life Bird so I’m excited to see one.  I fear it will soon become “ho hum,” though, because it’s so common on the island.

The bananaquit (Coereba flaveola) is a small, non-migratory bird — only the size of a black and white warbler — but it moves much faster than the warbler.  Can you say hyper-active?

It has a curved beak because it eats nectar for a living just like other tropical nectar-eaters: hummingbirds, sunbirds and honeycreepers.

Ornithologists have tentatively placed the bananaquit in the Tanager family but its family relations are often disputed.   Scientists argue about where to place this bird; these two argue about where to place themselves.

They were photographed at Campo Limpo Paulista, Brazil by Leon Bojarczuk.

 

(photo by Leon Bojarczuk via Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons license.  Click on the image to see the original)

 

p.s. I’ve written and pre-scheduled this week’s blogs ahead of time because Internet access is spotty where I’m staying at St. John, USVI.  I might not post/respond to your comments this week but I’ll be very active online next weekend!

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Jan 25 2015

Visiting Warblers At Their Winter Home

Published by under Songbirds,Travel

Black and white warbler (photo by Cris Hamilton)

Today I’m flying to a place that shares my name for a week of hiking with the Keystone Trails Association and Treks & Trails International.

When I heard about the trip last year I thought, How could I not visit St John in the U.S. Virgin Islands?  My husband wasn’t interested (he’d had obligations in Pittsburgh and now he can’t travel because of his concussion) but I knew this would be a great opportunity to visit warblers at their winter home.

Many warblers go to Central and South America for the winter but some stay in the Caribbean.  The most common ones at St. John are: northern parula, yellow warbler, blackpoll warbler, black and white warbler (above), American redstart and northern waterthrush.

I expect to see this bird in the coming week … and many birds I’ve never seen before.

Stay tuned.  :)

 

p.s. Internet access is spotty at St. John so I’ve written and pre-scheduled this week’s blogs ahead of time.  I might not post/respond to your comments this week but I’ll be very active online next weekend!

(photo by Cris Hamilton)

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Nov 12 2014

Check Every Vulture

Published by under Birds of Prey,Travel

Zone-taile Hawk illustration from the Crossley ID Guide Raptors via Wikimedia Commons

Last week at the Rio Grande Valley Birding Festival I wanted to see a zone-tailed hawk but the only way to do it was to check every vulture.

The relationship between zone-tailed hawks and turkey vultures goes way back.  Both are South and Central American birds who’ve hung out together for longer than we can imagine — so much so that the hawks now resemble the vultures.  Turkey vultures moved into North America but the hawks didn’t commit that far, only coming to Arizona, New Mexico and southern Texas in the summer.

Zone-tailed hawks (Buteo albonotatus) like to soar with turkey vultures and they easily blend in.  The hawks are slightly smaller, have the same bi-color underwings (dark leading edge and pale trailing edge), and soar with their wings set in a dihedral.

Where I come from a dark, soaring V means vulture so I wouldn’t give those birds a second thought, but look at the three birds soaring at the top left of Crossley’s illustration.  One of them isn’t a turkey vulture.  Can you tell which one?

Our trip leader, Bill Clark, told us how to find a zone-tailed “needle” in the turkey vulture “haystack.” Check each bird’s head and feet.

Turkey vultures have tiny, bald, reddish heads.  Zone-tailed hawks have dark, feathered, hawk-sized heads.  Turkey vultures have drab legs and feet.  Zone-tailed hawks have bright yellow legs and feet.  Turkey vultures have plain tails.  Zone-tailed hawks are named for the white “zone” band on their black tails.

Fortunately my “Life Bird” zone-tailed hawk flew quite close.  I saw his dark head, his yellow legs and feet, and the white zone on his tail.  Woo hoo!

Now that I’m back in Pittsburgh it’s a relief that I don’t have to check every vulture.  ;)

 

(illustration from The Crossley ID Guide Raptors via Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. Click on the image to see the original)

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Nov 10 2014

Flame-chested Crooked Beak

Published by under Songbirds,Travel

Pyrrhuloxia in Arizona (photo by SearchNetMedia on Flickr, Creative Commons license)

To a Pennsylvania birder (me) this looks like an odd female cardinal but it’s actually a male pyrrhuloxia.

Pyrrhuloxias (Cardinalis sinuatus) are closely related to northern cardinals and their ranges overlap in the southwestern U.S.  The pyrrhuloxias take the driest habitats, the cardinals take the wet ones.  If you live in southern Arizona or south Texas you may have both at your feeders.

How do you tell the difference at a glance?  Look at the beak.  Pyrrhuloxias have short, stubby, yellow beaks with a smaller and curved upper mandible.  Adult northern cardinals have bright red-orange beaks while immatures have dull brown-red.

The beak accounts for part of the pyrrhuloxia’s name.  Birds of North America Online explains that “Pyrrhu” comes from Pyrrhula, the genus for bullfinches meaning flame-colored or red. Loxia is the genus name for crossbills and means crooked.

Its a desert cardinal with a flame-colored chest and a crooked beak.

 

(photo taken in Tuscon, Arizona by SearchNetMedia via Flickr, Creative Commons license)

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Nov 08 2014

He Also Says His Name

Published by under Songbirds,Travel

Great Kiskadee (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

Almost every South Texas bird I’ve mentioned this week has a name that describes his song.

The green jay has onomatopoeic Spanish names, the chachalaca calls “cha-cha-lac,” and the great kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus), above, is easy to find because he always says his name.

Click here to hear.

 

(photo from Wikimedia Commons.  Click on the image to see the original)

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Nov 07 2014

Cha Cha Lac!

Watch the video and you’ll hear this bird say his name.

The plain chachalaca (Ortalis vetula) is the same size and shape as a female ring-necked pheasant but unlike the pheasant it lives in forests and scrublands from the Lower Rio Grande Valley to Costa Rica.

The chachalaca’s call has been described as “loud and simply indescribable,” deafening, ear-splitting, and “ranking with the call of the howler monkey” for shear loudness. (*Descriptions are from this link at Birds of North American Online)

The video shows only one bird calling so you might wonder, “What’s the big deal?”  To really understand the sound click here to hear a flock calling just after sunrise in Starr County, Texas.

At the beginning of the recording you’ll hear high falsetto calls. The females and immature males have high voices while adult males have deep ones because their tracheas are more than twice as long and wider in diameter.  Young males, like human teenagers, have to wait for their voices to change.

Chachalaca’s do their loudest whooping in the spring, so I won’t have to cover my ears when I encounter this bird … But I may have to wait for the rain to stop before he puts in an appearance. (It’s been raining in South Texas for 3 days!)

Cha-cha-lac!

 

(video posted by Robert Straub on YouTube)

 

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Nov 06 2014

Introduce Me

Published by under Birds of Prey,Travel

Aplomado falcon, Laguna Atascosa NWR, Texas (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

They’re as long as a peregrine but only half their weight.  They fly like accipiters or even nighthawks.  They hunt cooperatively and can use motorcycles to flush prey.

Aplomado falcons (Falco femoralis) used to nest in savannas, grasslands and shrub-steppe from Arizona to the lower Rio Grande Valley but they disappeared from the U.S. in 1952 due to habitat loss and DDT.  They were listed as endangered in 1986.

In 1987 The Peregrine Fund established an aplomado reintroduction program similar to the captive breeding program that restored the peregrine.  Since the 1990’s they’ve hacked 1,500 aplomado chicks in South Texas but restoration has been slow and difficult because the young birds face so many dangers in the wild.

The aplomado is still on the Endangered Species list but now breeds again in South Texas. To help the young survive The Peregrine Fund provides special nesting boxes which the adults prefer because the boxes protect their chicks.

Thanks to the reintroduction program I now have the chance to see an aplomado falcon at the Rio Grande Valley Birding Festival.

He’s my goal this week.  Introduce me!

 

(photo by Elaine R. Wilson from Wikimedia Commons.  Click on the image to see the original)

p.s. I saw them two days in a row!  5 Nov 2014 on Bill Clark’s Valley Raptors tour and 6 Nov 2014 at Old Port Isabel Road.  Yay!

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