Archive for the 'Quiz' Category

Feb 07 2011

Quiz: What plant is this?

Published by under Quiz


I can usually identify this plant in a heartbeat, but I was stumped when I saw this photograph.  Maybe you will be too, so I’ve made it a quiz. 

Here are some clues:

  • The plant is a perennial native of Asia.
  • It’s invasive in North America wherever it’s found.
  • The stems are hollow and stand over 10 feet tall, persisting through the winter.
  • The plant spreads by wind-borne seeds and rhizomes. 
  • The rhizomes are particularly difficult to eradicate and result in dense stands of this plant.
  • It was originally brought here as an ornamental because it’s flowers are arranged in pretty cream-colored sprays above the stems.  (This is the flower stalk in winter.)
  • The young stems are edible and taste like rhubarb but Americans don’t like it well enough it to reduce its population by harvesting.

Do you know what it is?  Leave a comment with your answer.

(photo by Dianne Machesney)

23 responses so far

Feb 02 2011

Winter Weeds: Goldenrod


If you recognize this flower in August it also looks familiar at this time of year.

Tall or Canada Goldenrod is a native perennial that maintains its shape, even in winter.  It still stands two to six feet tall, it still carries alternate leaves on a rough stem and it still holds up a plume-like spire where the flowers used to be.  The spire was a dense cluster of golden flowers in August.  Now it’s a dense cluster of seeds.

You’ll find goldenrod in open areas, often in large patches because the rhizomes (roots) spread underground.

Goldenrod species are notoriously difficult to identify.  I listed two names for this plant because I’m not sure which one it is.  It might be Tall Goldenrod, maybe Canada Goldenrod, maybe something else.  It doesn’t matter.  My excuse is that the plant isn’t in good condition. 

And here’s a Quiz:  Can you identify the tall plant on the left edge of this photo?  I discussed it in an earlier Winter Weeds blog.  Remember?

p.s. Today is Groundhog Day.  Check here for news from Punxsutawney Phil.  Rumor has it he did not see his shadow so Spring is near.

(photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

11 responses so far

Jan 24 2011

Quiz: Whose Baby?

Published by under Beyond Bounds,Quiz


Quiz!

Whose curly-headed baby bird is this?

Here are some hints:

  • He is on an island in the Pacific Ocean.
  • His species is critically endangered because 99.9% of them nest this island only.
  • His parents built no nest.  His mother laid his egg on bare ground.
  • It took two months for this baby to hatch, then six more months before he can fly.
  • His parents feed him regurgitated oil derived from fish, squid and crustaceans.
  • Sometimes he must wait a long time between feedings because his parents travel 6 to 60 miles to find food.
  • He is one of 22 species in this family of birds (species count from BirdLife International).
  • A famous poem tells us it’s very bad luck to kill this type of bird.

Do you know who he is?  Leave a comment with your answer. 

UPDATE at 9:45am:  Most of you guessed the family of birds correctly.  Can any of you guess the exact species?  Hint: This is a tropical island.

.

(photo by Deborah Acklin)

18 responses so far

Dec 30 2010

Quiz: Who else can fly like this?

Published by under Quiz


Quick!  Name an animal — not a bird — that can fly like this.  Here are some clues.

  • This animal doesn’t flap, but it does fly.
  • It has better lift and less drag than many insects.
  • It’s lift ability is the same as for hawks and wood ducks.
  • The longest time it’s been recorded aloft is 45 seconds.
  • It can travel as much as 1,300 feet in one flight.  That’s more than 4 football fields!
  • And, with the help of the wind, it can speed along at 43 miles per hour.

Leave a comment with your answer.

(If you’re really stumped, the answer is at this link.)

(photo from Wikimedia Commons.  Click on the image to see the original)

7 responses so far

Dec 21 2010

Quiz: Where do rabbits go in the winter?

Published by under Mammals,Quiz


Today’s quiz is something I’ve been wondering about.

In spring, summer and fall rabbits were everywhere and easy to find.  Now that the ground is snow covered, I haven’t seen any and I’ve found only one set of tracks in all my travels. 

So where did the rabbits go?  Are they hiding?  Or sleeping? 

My reference guides make it sound like the winter life of rabbits is barely different from summer’s except that they change their diet from leaves to twigs.  I find it hard to believe that that’s the only difference.

If you know what rabbits do and where they go in the winter, please leave a comment to let me know. 

I’m sure many of us will learn from it!

(photo by D. Gordon E. Robertson from Wikipedia. Click on the photo to see the original.)

26 responses so far

Dec 13 2010

Like a Bullet

Published by under Quiz


Browsing through my stockpile of photos I found this one by Peter Bell. 

Guess what bird this is.

Hint:  It makes my day!

(photo by Peter Bell)

5 responses so far

Dec 09 2010

Quiz: Whose Nest?

Published by under Quiz


Now that the trees are bare I’m sure you’ve noticed large ball-shaped nests in the bigger trees. 

Do you know whose nests these are? 

Here’s some information that may help you answer the question:

  • The nests are round and about the size of a beachball.
  • They’re as much as 70 feet above the ground.  Click on the nest photo to see what they look like from a distance.
  • The outer layer is often covered in leaves.
  • The inside is lined with moss, grasses, shredded bark, etc.
  • The opening of this nest is not on top.  Instead it faces the tree trunk.  Can you guess where the opening is on a nest that has no trunk near it?
  • Believe it or not, this nest is water resistant.

So, whose nest is this?  Leave a comment with your answer.

(photos by Marcy Cunkelman)

17 responses so far

Nov 28 2010

Quiz: What happened here?

Published by under Quiz


Today’s quiz should be easy for anyone who lives in Pennsylvania. 

I found this damaged hemlock in Moraine State Park last weekend. 

  • What happened to this tree?
  • Who did this?  And why?
  • Does this happen to trees of any size?
  • Does this normally happen to hemlocks?
  • Hardest question:  What significance does tomorrow, November 29, have for this particular tree?

Post a comment with your answer.

p.s. I will be traveling today so you’ll see all the comments appear at once when I get to a computer and approve them.

(photo by Kate St. John)

9 responses so far

Nov 01 2010

Quiz: Not a Thrush?

Published by under Migration,Quiz,Songbirds


Yesterday I was happy to see a flock of these birds on the exposed, dry mud at Shenango River Lake.  I know their identity but they’re tricky, so here’s a quiz. 

One quick glance tells you this bird is not a sparrow because his beak is too thin. 

Is he a thrush?  He has a striped breast, short neck, thrush-like stance, almost-thrush-sized bill, and he walks a lot. 

A longer look reveals many Not Thrush things about him. 

  • He’s a little smaller than a Swainson’s thrush.  This is hard to determine because he is rarely near anything that gives him scale.
  • He is only found in open tundra-like landscape, never in the forest.
  • He has wing bars.  Our eastern thrushes don’t.
  • His outer tail edges are white.  (You can see this when he flies.)
  • When he walks he darts and jabs, unlike the walk-and-pause of thrushes.
  • He pumps his tail and almost wags.  This is not the slow raise-and-lower pumping of the hermit thrush.  
  • In flight he’s bouncier than a goldfinch.
  • And like a goldfinch he always calls when he flies.  His call is a dead giveaway.  He says his name.

Final hint:  This bird is a treat to see because he neither breeds nor winters in Pennsylvania.

What do you think?  Leave a comment with your answer.

(photo by Steve Gosser)

6 responses so far

Oct 26 2010

Quiz: What tree?

Published by under Quiz,Schenley Park,Trees


I believe I know the answer but I’m not absolutely sure so I’m asking you, dear readers.

What tree is this with such bountiful fruit?  It’s a short, ornamental tree, probably non-native.  Notice how the bright red fruit hangs in clusters from the branches.  I’m amazed the birds were not eating it yet.

Want to see it for yourself?  It’s one of several such trees in Schenley Park on the right side of the walk to the ice rink near Schenley Oval.

If you know its name – or even have a wild guess - leave a comment to let us know.

(photo by Kate St. John)

10 responses so far

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