Archive for the 'Phenology' Category

Apr 07 2013

First Native Flower

Published by under Phenology,Plants

Snow Trillium at Cedar Creek Park (photo by Dianne Machesney)

Yesterday I wrote about coltsfoot but it’s not the first native wildflower to bloom in western Pennsylvania.  That honor goes to snow trillium (Trillium nivale).

I looked for snow trillium last weekend at Raccoon Creek Wildflower Reserve and found the leaves but the deer had eaten all the flowers.    :(

Dianne and Bob Machesney found these blooming at Cedar Creek Park in Westmoreland County.

Thankfully there are fewer deer at Cedar Creek.

(photo by Dianne Machesney)

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Apr 06 2013

At Last!

Published by under Phenology,Plants

Coltsfoot blooming (photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

At last I’ve found coltsfoot blooming.  Spring is officially here.

Coltsfoot is an introduced plant that blooms earlier than most of our native wildflowers.  It’s not picky about habitat so you’ll find these dandelion-like flowers by the side of the road and in waste places.

When you see the flower you won’t see the leaves.  They’re hidden at the base of the plant right now but will grow into large colts’- foot-shaped leaves after the flowers are gone.

Coltsfoot blooming, from the side (photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

 

Normally I find coltsfoot blooming around March 25.  In last year’s hot weather it appeared on March 14.  You can see why I’m impatient.

At last!

(photos by Marcy Cunkelman)

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Mar 31 2013

Easter Flowers

Published by under Phenology,Plants

Crocus with honey bee (photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

Easter is early, winter is late. Few flowers are blooming in western Pennsylvania.

This weekend my surviving crocuses opened fully to receive a visit from a honeybee. He emerged with pollen pantaloons just like this bee in Marcy Cunkelman’s garden.

The bees are happy to find flowers this Easter Day.

 

(photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

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Mar 25 2013

Spring Moves North 13 Miles A Day

Published by under Phenology,Plants

Tulips blooming in Moscow (photo rom Wikimedia Commons)

Snow again!  We are so ready for spring here in Pittsburgh.

The crocuses bloomed early last week but were slammed shut on Wednesday by a low of 200F.  Daffodil leaves emerged and paused.  Don’t even ask about tulips.

But Spring is south of us and it’s on its way.  There’s a rule of thumb that says Spring moves north 13 miles a day.

Here’s an easy way to watch its progress.

Journey North has a Tulip Test Garden website where observers report when leaves emerge and flowers bloom from the tulip bulbs they planted last fall. Many of the tulip gardens are student projects at elementary schools such as Della Kurtzhals’ class at Clarion Area Elementary School in Clarion, PA.

So how far away is spring?   At Providence Day School in Charlotte, NC the first tulip bloomed on March 18.   Using the rule of thumb, here’s my guess at blooming times in Pittsburgh and Clarion:

  • Pittsburgh is 372 air miles north of Charlotte so I estimate our first tulip will bloom on April 15.
  • Clarion is about 430 miles north of Charlotte so their tulips will probably bloom on April 20.

This is just an estimate. Actual blooming times may vary.  I won’t be charged like Punxsutawney Phil was for “misrepresenting spring.”  (Click here to read about the charges made against him in Hamilton, Ohio.  The comments are hilarious.)

So while your garden is covered in snow, rest assured that spring is moving north.  You can see it approaching on the Tulip Test Garden map.

 

(photo from Wikimedia Commons.  Click on the image to see the original)

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Mar 16 2013

Greening Up

Published by under Phenology,Plants

Honeysuckle leaves, 15 Mar 2013 (photo by Kate St. John)

Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day…

The first plant to open leaves in my neighborhood is always the invasive bush honeysuckle across the street.  Though I’m not fond of the species I’m always happy to see these particular bushes green up.  They’re one of my signs of Spring.

Yesterday, March 15, was the first time the leaves were green enough to see at a distance.

A year ago the hot weather put us well beyond honeysuckle leaves and into magnolia flowers by this date.

Here’s a picture from March 16,2012.

Magnolia flower opening, 16 March 2012 (photo by Kate St. John)

 

Frankly, I’m quite happy we’re having a normal spring.

(photos by Kate St. John)

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Feb 20 2013

Morning Song

Mourning Dove in Urbana, IL (photo by Dori on Wikimedia Commons)

On February mornings, the mourning doves sing songs of love.

The males perch high and puff their throats when they sing.  Though they are slender, they resemble pigeons when they do this.

Coo-OOOO Cooo Cooo Cooo.

Some say they sound like owls but those who think the sound is mournful named this dove.

Click here to hear their mourning morning song.

 

AND A QUIZ!    Identify the other bird singing in the recording.  His song is not normally heard in southwestern PA in the summer.  The mourning dove lives year-round from Maine to Mexico, from Canada to Cuba.  The other bird will give you a hint on the location of the recording.

 

(photo by Dori on Wikimedia Commons. Click on the image to see the original)

6 responses so far

Jan 01 2013

2012: The Year In Review

Nature was busy and interesting in 2012.  The weather was hot, stormy, dry, and sometimes wet. This brought exciting developments in the natural world.

Here’s a month-to-month roundup of my favorite high points with each photo linked to an article about the event.  Some link to my blog, others link to information on the web that I didn’t point out at the time.

 

  • January: Snowy owls were abundant in the northern U.S. into March. (photo by Shawn Collins)
  • February: The warm winter prompted a massive Canada goose migration on February 27 in eastern Pennsylvania, New York State and Ontario. (photo by Chuck Tague)
  • March:  Pittsburgh’s temperatures averaged 11.9 degrees above normal with some days 20 degrees above normal. Spring wildflowers bloomed 4-6 weeks early. (photo by Kate St. John)
  • April: There was a mass migration of Red Admiral butterflies in mid-April. (photo from Wikimedia Commons)
  • May: Birds who wintered in the U.S. migrated early but the warblers were right on time. (photo by Bobby Greene)
  • June: A new peregrine family was confirmed at Tarentum, PA when their nestlings appeared on the bridge. (photo by Steve Gosser)
  • July: Drought! (photo from NOAA NWS)
  • August: Every year I count nighthawks passing my home during their August migration.  Every year there are fewer.  Sadly, 2012 was no exception. (photo from Wikimedia Commons)
  • September: Arctic sea ice at its lowest extent ever. (photo from NOAA)
  • October: Hurricane Sandy brings unusual birds to western Pennsylvania. (photo by Jeff McDonald)

  • November: A surprising number of western hummingbirds visit Pennsylvania: rufous, calliope, Allen’s (photo by Scott Kinsey)
  • December: Evening grosbeaks visit Pennsylvania after decades of absence (photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

 

Happy New Year!

 

3 responses so far

Nov 04 2012

The Trees Are Bare?

Lots of the trees are bare now that Hurricane Sandy came through Pennsylvania.  But not everywhere.

Here, the trees look wintry in Schenley Park on November 1.

But just around the corner the view from Panther Hollow Bridge is mixed.  The large sycamore is bare — see the ghostly white bark? — but the red oaks still show off their russet tones.  (These pictures are dark because it was raining. It rained every day last week.)

 

Elsewhere in Pennsylvania, winter comes earlier.

Here’s a picture from the Quehanna Wild Area taken on October 13.  Three weeks ago most of the trees were already bare in this part of Clearfield County.

What’s it like where you live?

(photos by Kate St. John)

 

 

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Oct 06 2012

Fall Color

The maples are changing color in Schenley Park. The weather is changing too.

If you haven’t turned on the furnace yet, you’ll need it tonight. Fall is here.

(photo by Kate St. John)

One response so far

May 06 2012

Golden Yellow

Published by under Phenology,Plants

Have you ever noticed how many things are yellow in the Spring?

Many warblers are yellow — it helps them hide among yellow-green leaves.  Many flowers are yellow — their pollinators are attracted to that color.

Golden ragwort (Packera aurea) is yellow too.

It’s blooming now in western Pennsylvania.

(photo by Dianne Machesney)

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