Archive for the 'Insects, Fish, Frogs' Category

Oct 25 2014

Moth Identity Challenges

Published by under Insects, Fish, Frogs

Moth found in Harrison Hills County Park, Allegheny County, 23 Oct 2014 (photo by Kate St. John)

Yesterday I photographed this half-inch-long moth at Harrison Hills County Park near Natrona Heights.

This morning I tried to identify it at butterfliesandmoths.org using the online photos.  I was able to narrow my list to 20 possibilities out of more than 3,000 moths but none of them were correct when I compared closely.

Changing tactics I used the regional perspective:  Which of my 20 possibilities were on the Allegheny County moth checklist?  The checklist subtracted 10 and added four.  However, my faith in that checklist was shattered when I discovered it’s missing Malacosoma americanum, the eastern tentworm moth, that Tom Pawlesh photographed in Allegheny County and posted on the website.

Nonetheless the checklist gave me a hint.  Perhaps this is one of the owlet moths, Noctuidae.  It looks a bit like Eupsillia tristigmata.

Searching through Noctuidae at BugGuide.net I found one here that looks like mine but no one has identified it.

Yet.

Perhaps you can tell me what it is.  Please leave a comment with your answer.

 

(photo by Kate St. John)

p.s. Fascinating news on Monday Oct 27:  Owlet moths pollinate witch-hazel flowers at night!

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Oct 23 2014

TBT: Monster Of The Ohio

Published by under Insects, Fish, Frogs

Sam Hall and "Wally" the walleye, Ohio River, Oct 11, 2008

Sam Hall and “Wally” the walleye, Ohio River, Oct 11, 2008

What can you catch in the river in October?  The Monster of the Ohio.

On Throw-Back Thursday (TBT), here’s a fish story from October 2008.

 

(photo from Sam Hall)

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Oct 12 2014

Not A Rose

Goldenrod gall (photo by Kate St. John)

Though shaped like a green rose this knob is not a flower. It’s a goldenrod bunch gall.

A search at BugGuide.net(*) indicates:

The gall was made by a midge, Rhopalomyia solidaginis, that lays its egg at the tip of the goldenrod stem.  “Its larva secretes a chemical that prevents the goldenrod stem from growing although it continues to produce leaves, thus a shortened bunch of leaves is formed.”(*)

The resulting rosette provides shelter for many insects as well as the midge.

This fall I’ve seen many bunch galls in goldenrod fields.  This one was at Wingfield Pines in southern Allegheny County.

Click here to read more about the midge at BugGuide.net.

 

(photo by Kate St. John)

 

2 responses so far

Oct 04 2014

On Milkweed

Published by under Insects, Fish, Frogs

Milkweed bug and grasshopper on milkweed pod (photo by Kate St. John)

Thursday evening at Fern Hollow Nature Center I found two insects perched on a milkweed pod.

The grasshopper is doing his best to blend in.

The milkweed bug doesn’t need to.  He eats milkweed so he’s poisonous.

He wears ‘danger colors’ like the monarch butterfly:  black and orange.

Milkweed bug (photo by Kate St. John)

 

(photo by Kate St. John)

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Sep 20 2014

Who’s On First?

Published by under Insects, Fish, Frogs

Question mark butterfly, fall form (photo by Kate St. John)

I am so new to butterfly identification that most of them prompt a question.  I photographed this one near the Kiski River in Armstrong County last Sunday.  What’s the name of this butterfly?

“It’s a question mark.”

No, really, I want to know.  Here’s the ventral side.  What’s the name of this butterfly?

Underside of question mark butterfly, fall form ... but cannot see the mark (photo by Kate St. John)

“It’s a question mark.”

Honestly, I’m not kidding.  What’s the name of this butterfly?

“It’s a question mark because it has a small white question mark on the underside of its hind wing.”

Well, this one doesn’t.  At least not that I can see.  Please tell me, What’s the name of this butterfly?

It’s a question mark, Polygonia interrogationis.

I give up.  Who’s on First?

(Watch Abbott and Costello drive each other nuts in this video of their Who’s on First? skit.)

 

(photos by Kate St. John)

2 responses so far

Sep 13 2014

Isabella Scoffs At Winter

Isabella tiger moth caterpillar (photo by Kate St. John)

Yesterday I found this Isabella Tiger moth caterpillar in Schenley Park.  Does she have a prediction for the coming winter?

Legend has it that wide brown stripes on woolly bear caterpillars predict a mild winter; narrow brown stripes mean a harsh one.

In the 1950′s the former curator of insects at the American Museum of Natural History surveyed a very small sample of woolly bears and found that the caterpillars had an 80% accuracy rate.  However, no one’s been able to replicate Dr. C. H. Curran’s findings.  Instead a whole host of factors influence the stripes including species, diet and age.  Especially age.  The older instars are browner.

And frankly, this caterpillar doesn’t care how harsh the winter.  It can survive to -90 degrees F, hibernating as a caterpillar (not in a cocoon!) curled up in a ball under a rock or bark.  It freezes completely except for the innermost portions of its cells which are protected by naturally produced glycerol.  In the spring the caterpillar thaws and resumes eating before making a cocoon and becoming a moth.

Theoretically this particular caterpillar is saying “mild winter” but we know it ain’t so.

Isabella scoffs at winter.

Read more here about the woolly bear legend and amazing winter feats.

 

(photo by Kate St. John)

2 responses so far

Aug 21 2014

TBT: Laying Eggs

Published by under Insects, Fish, Frogs

Cicada on a tree branch (photo by JohnTsui via Wikimedia Commons)

Throw Back Thursday (TBT):

August is a busy time for cicadas.  Though there aren’t a lot of them this year, those that are here are busy mating and laying eggs for the next generation.

Did you know that cicadas lay their eggs under the bark of tree twigs?  Eventually you can tell where they’ve done it because the leaves turn brown on the branch tips.

Brown tips on tree branches because of cicada egg-laying (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

Back in 2008 I caught one in the act.  Click here to read about cicadas laying eggs.

 

(photo of cicada on tree branch by John Tsui via Wikimedia Commons.  photo of brown tree tips from Wikimedia Commons.  Click on each image to see its original)

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Aug 16 2014

Love This Blue

Published by under Insects, Fish, Frogs

Red spotted purple butterfly (photo by Kate St. John)

The color of indigo buntings and mountain bluebirds, this butterfly is pretending to be something else.

Its name is “Red Spotted Purple” (Limenitis arthemis) — no mention of blue! — and its color mimics the poisonous Pipevine Swallowtail.   I suppose the orangish red spots on its underside gave it its name.

This one was mud-puddling with other butterflies at Jennings Prairie last weekend, but I ignored them because they weren’t this color.

I have never seen the deep blue Pipevine Swallowtail.

Love this color.

 

(photo by Kate St. John)

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Aug 10 2014

Not a Hummingbird

Published by under Insects, Fish, Frogs

Hummingbird moth at wild bergamot (photo by Steve Gosser)

Here’s a moth that’s the same size and color as a hummingbird and it uses the same hovering technique.

The hummingbird clearwing moth (Hemaris thysbe) even migrates — another bird-like trait.

Steve Gosser captured this moth sipping wild bergamot.

When you glance at your garden look carefully.  That hummingbird might be a moth.

 

(photo by Steve Gosser)

2 responses so far

Aug 09 2014

August Nectar

Honeybee at blue vervain, August 2014 (photo by Kate St. John)

August flowers have broken the nectar dearth.

This honeybee is feeding at blue vervain (Verbena hastata) in Schenley Park.

(photo by Kate St. John)

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