Archive for the 'Bird Behavior' Category

Sep 12 2014

How Quickly Can You Pass These Tests?

This is a test.  For the next 3+ minutes wild New Caledonian crows will solve six physics problems in water displacement.

What will raise the floating treat?  If there are two treats which method is fastest?  The challenges are:

  1. Sand versus Water:  Will the crow know that there’s no point in dropping stones onto sand?
  2. Light versus Heavy objects:  Do heavy objects work better than light ones?
  3. Solid versus Hollow objects: Do solid objects work better than hollow ones even though the hollow objects weigh the same?
  4. Narrow water column versus Wide:  Which column takes longer to elevate?
  5. High versus Low water:  Is it faster to get the treat when the water is already close to the top?
  6. U-tube with a hidden connection:  Very hard! Will the crow figure out that one of the wide tubes governs the water level in the narrow one?

In the video the crows solve every problem but behind the scenes they faltered on the U-tube test so the scientists say they flunked it.

How quickly can you solve these physics problems?  Be quick on the U-tube test or else …

This experiment was tried with New Caledonian crows, Eurasian jays, and human children.  Read all about it here in PLOS One.

My favorite quote from the Discussion is: “The results from the current U-tube experiment suggest that New Caledonian crows are comparable to Eurasian jays, but differ from human children.”   ;)

 

(video from PLOS Media on YouTube)

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Sep 01 2014

For All The Working Birds

Harris' Hawk working as a falconer's bird in Spain (photo by Manuel González Olaechea y Franco via Wikimedia Commons)

Some birds work for a living just like we do. This Harris hawk hunts for a falconer in Spain.

This year’s most famous working bird is Rufus the Hawk who patrols Wimbledon to scare away pigeons.  Click here for the beautiful Stella Artois commercial in which he stars.

Today humans get a day off in the U.S.

Happy Labor Day.

 

(Harris Hawk working as a falconer’s bird at Alcalá de Henares, Spain. Photo by Manuel González Olaechea y Franco via Wikimedia Commons. Click on the image to see the original)

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Aug 15 2014

Raging Chickens

Lest we think that peregrines are the only birds that fight, take a look at this slow motion video of dueling sharp-tailed grouse from Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Though they don’t have meat-tearing beaks and sharp talons these grouse are doing some damage to each other.

You won’t see this in August, even if you’re at the northern grasslands they call home.  Fighting is an activity that sharp-tailed grouse reserve for springtime courtship.  The males gather at the lek (courtship stomping grounds) and mix it up to prove who’s best.

Click here for a larger view of the video.

 

(video from Cornell Lab of Ornithology on YouTube)

 

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Aug 14 2014

TBT: Spunky

House Sparrow at Schenley Plaza (photo by Kate St. John)

Throw Back Thursday (TBT):

By August Pittsburgh’s house sparrow flocks have grown substantially and the birds are bold.  At Schenley Plaza they ask for handouts.

Click here for my encounter with a spunky sparrow in August 2008.   They’re up to the same tricks this week.

 

(photo by Kate St. John)

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Jul 31 2014

TBT: How Cowbirds Know They Are Cowbirds

Immaure brown-headed cowbird (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

On Throw Back Thursday (TBT)…

At this time of year most birds have stopped breeding and are starting to flock for the coming winter.  Many of us have noticed grackle flocks and soon, I’m sure, we’ll see flocks of brown-headed cowbirds.

The fact that young cowbirds flock with each other is a miracle in itself.  Every one of them was dumped as an egg in another species’ nest where they out-competed their foster parents’ young.   Imprinting behavior says they ought to think they’re members of the foster species, but they don’t.

How do cowbirds know they are cowbirds?  Click here to find out in this Throw Back Thursday article.

 

(photo of an immature brown-headed cowbird by Cephas at Wikimedia Commons.  Click on the image to see the original)

 

 

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Jul 11 2014

Slow Down And Watch

Here’s a beautiful wildlife video of beetles and birds in slow motion.

Slow down and watch.

Happy Friday!

 

(video from Cornell Lab of Ornithology via YouTube)

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Jul 10 2014

TBT: The Size of Baby Birds

Published by under Bird Behavior

Wood duck mother and babies (photo by Chuck Tague)
On Throw Back Thursday (TBT), let’s revisit an article on the size of baby birds.

Have you ever seen a tiny baby pigeon walking around with its parents?

No.

Why do we see baby ducks but never baby pigeons? Click here to read why.

 

(photo of wood duck mother and babies by Chuck Tague)

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Jul 09 2014

Feed Me!

Published by under Bird Behavior

Chipping sparrow juvenile, begging from adult (photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

Early July is a great time to watch songbird families.  Many baby birds have just fledged and are still dependent on their parents for food … or they would like to be.

Marcy Cunkelman sees the family interactions up close in her birds-and-butterflies garden.  Here are some of her family portraits.

Above, we see that fledglings are the same size as their parents but don’t always look like them.  You can tell they’re related by their actions as this young chipping sparrow begs for food while his parent leans away from the noise!  The juvenile’s stripes provide camouflage but make him resemble a song sparrow more than the pale, plain-chested adult.

Below, a tree swallow feeds her newly fledged baby.  Since swallows capture insects on the wing, the juveniles have to fly well enough to catch bugs before they’re able to feed themselves.
Tree swallow feeding young (photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

 

And below, a downy woodpecker offers a seed to his baby.  When the babies are young the parents lead them to the feeders and offer them seeds.  Pretty soon the juveniles figure out that it’s faster to get the seeds on their own.
Female downy woodpecker feeding young (photo by Marcy Cunkelman)

 

Soon the youngsters will be independent.  Meanwhile you’ll see them say, “Feed me!”

 

p.s. Wissahickon Nature Club will have an outing to Marcy’s garden this coming Saturday, July 12.  Click here for details.

 

(all photos by Marcy Cunkleman)

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Jun 25 2014

Til Death Do Us Part

One of a pair of snow geese at Martin's Creek PP&L, June 2014 (photo by Jon Mularczyk)

In this month of wedding vows …

Jon Mularczyk confirmed that there are still four snow geese at the Martin’s Creek PP&L lands in Northampton County.  This species is quite unusual in Pennsylvania in June.

All the other five million snow geese are nesting at their arctic breeding grounds right now and their eggs are about to hatch.  The four geese near Bangor, PA should have left months ago.

Why are they still here?  Because they mate for life.

When snow geese are two years old they choose a mate … forever.  Their pair bond is so strong and so permanent that they will never abandon each other as long as they live.  The bird pictured above is able-bodied and could fly to the arctic but his mate, below, has a broken wing.  He won’t leave without her.
Snow goose with broken wing at Martin's Creek PP&L, June 2014 (photo by Jon Mularczyk)

The other two geese are probably their one-year old “kids.”  Young snow geese stay with their parents during their first round-trip migration so if Mom and Dad get stuck in Pennsylvania the kids stay, too.  Family ties are important.

Humans could learn a lot from snow geese.

Til death do us part.

 

(photos by Jon Mularczyk, Broad-Winged Photography)

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Jun 18 2014

Magical

Upland sandpiper (photo by Dan Arndt)

Strip mining consumes nearly 3,000 acres of Pennsylvania every year but there’s a ray of hope when the mines are reclaimed.  The “strips” become grasslands that could attract this bird.

Though they are “shorebirds” upland sandpipers don’t live at the shore.  They’re the quintessential grassland bird and an indicator of healthy tallgrass prairie.  Eight months of the year they live on the pampas (grasslands) of Argentina but in early spring they fly 6,000 to 8,000 miles, sometimes in as little as a week, to nest in the grasslands of North America.  Present from April to August, they stay here only four months.

In this century it’s a privilege to see one.  In the late 1800’s the upland plover, as it was called at the time, was market-hunted to fill the dining niche vacated by the suddenly scarce passenger pigeon.  Trainloads of dead “plovers” were shipped East while settlers drained the prairie and converted it to farmland.  Nowadays habitat loss and pesticides continue to threaten the bird’s existence.  Bartramia longicauda is listed as endangered in Pennsylvania.

Upland sandpipers are magical birds.  Your first hint of their presence may be a long mellow courtship whistle, given in flight or upon alighting (click here to hear), or their short whistle: “Ba-tui-tui.

They are graceful in almost everything they do.  In flight they use a distinctive rapid fluttering style reserved for the breeding grounds. Scan the fenceposts and you’ll find one perched where he landed with wings held aloft in a V, then slowly lowered.  It’s worth waiting to see one do this.  With its 20 inch wingspan, you can’t help but notice the bird.
Upland sandpiper (photo by Dan Arndt)

Upland sandpipers are very picky about grass.  They require upland, ungrazed grassland with three kinds of habitat: perches for courtship, tall vegetation with overhanging cover for the nest, low vegetation for their young to forage in.  They are also picky about grass species, preferring native grasses to invasives.  This means there are few places to find them in Pennsylvania.

The opportunity to see an upland sandpiper is so tempting, though, that birders will drive long distances to find them.  When I read last week that they were seen in Clarion County I drove an hour and a half last Sunday to meet up with Carole Winslow, Clarion County’s bird compiler.   We found a birder from New Jersey who had driven 5 hours to find “uppies.” He was lured by the magic, too.

Carole and I were very lucky. We saw four upland sandpipers in a large field at Mt. Airy and as we drove away were startled to see one perched on a fencepost close to the road.   Oh my!  We stopped in our tracks.  He took our breath away.

 

(Photos by Dan Arndt, Creative Commons license.  Dan lives in Calgary and writes for two blogs: Birds Calgary and Bird Canada. His most recent blog celebrated Rachel Carson’s birthday (a native of the Pittsburgh area) with a photo of a peregrine. Woo hoo!)

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