Archive for the 'Beyond Bounds' Category

Dec 18 2014

TBT: Walks On Water

African Jacana chick at a zoo in Japan (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

Throw Back Thursday: (TBT)

This tiny bird practically walks on water.

Read more about him and the unusual lifestyles of his parents in this blog post from 2011:  Walks On Water

 

(photo from Wikimedia Commons. Click on the image to see the original)

No responses yet

Dec 12 2014

The Falcon Of The Queen

Screenshot of Falco della regina (screenshot from YouTube)

This beautiful YouTube video shows a family of Eleonora’s falcons (Falco eleonorae) at their summer home in Sardinia.

Eleonora’s falcon is an Old World hobby(*) falcon that winters in Madagascar and East Africa and nests on barren islands in the Mediterranean.  It was named for Eleonor of Arborea, national heroine of Sardinia. When you know Eleonor’s history you can see the honor of this name.

Eleonor took over Arborea, a sovereign state in west-central Sardinia, in a moment of crisis in 1383. The Crown of Aragon based in Barcelona had conquered all of Sardinia except Arborea and succession to the Arborean throne was shaken by the murder of Hugh III. Eleonor’s infant son Frederick was next in line to the throne so she rushed to Arborea and became regent Judge at age 36. In the first four years of her reign she united the Sardinians in a war against Aragon and won back nearly all of the island.

Eleonor’s greatest legacy was the Carta de Logu, the laws she promulgated in 1395.  Advanced for its time the laws were a uniform code of justice, publicly available, that set most criminal penalties as fines instead of imprisonment or death and preserved the property rights of women.  The Carta de Logu was so good that it lasted four centuries.

Eleonor passed another important though lesser known law: the protection of this falcon that bears her name.

As the video title says in Italian, this is the Falcon of the Queen.

 

(video posted on YouTube by santonagriva)

(*) Hobbies are smaller than peregrines, larger than American kestrels, and were often used by falconers to hunt birds. “Hobby” does not mean amateur pastime. Instead this word comes from Old French, probably derived from Middle Dutch “hobeler” which means to turn or roll.

No responses yet

Dec 07 2014

Chicken In The Sky

Stellar nursery IC 2944 as seen by ESO's Very Large Telescope (photo by ESO)

If our eyes could look deep into space we’d see the clouds in this stellar nursery in the Centaurus constellation, 6,500 light years away.

This pink glowing nebula and clouds of dust were photographed by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) at Cerro Paranal, Chile.  The nebula’s formal name is IC 2944.  Because it’s visible to the naked eye it has a nickname too: The Running Chicken Nebula.

According to ESO’s description, the clouds are Thackeray globules “under fierce bombardment from the ultraviolet radiation from nearby hot young stars.”

Click here or on the image to find out what will happen to the clouds.

If you know where to look on a clear night, you can see a running chicken in the sky.

 

 

(photo of stellar nursery IC 2944 by ESO, the European Southern Observatory at Cerro Paranal, Chile. Click on the image to see the original)

One response so far

Dec 06 2014

Another Kind Of Siskin

Published by under Beyond Bounds

Eurasian siskin (photo by K.Lin, Hiyashi Haka, Cretive Commons license via Flickr))

While we listen and watch for pine siskins in Pennsylvania, here’s one of their cousins from the other side of the world.

This male Eurasian siskin (Carduelis spinus) resembles a pine siskin but his colors are more striking with his black cap and bright yellow and black wings and tail.  He lives in northern Europe and northeastern Asia and irrupts southward in some winters, just like our siskins do.  (Click here to see North America’s pine siskin for comparison.)

Without knowing his identity you could probably guess “siskin” if you saw him in Taiwan where he was photographed by K.Lin (a.k.a. Hiyashi Haka).

Please click on the image to see the original photo and scroll down to read K.Lin’s description of this bird.

 

(photo by K. Lin, Hiyashi Haka on Flickr, Creative Common license)

2 responses so far

Nov 30 2014

Rarely Stands Still

Published by under Beyond Bounds

Silver-eared Mesia (Leiothrix argentauris), Mae Wong National Park, Nakhon Sawan,Thailand (photo by JJ Harrison via Wikimedia Commons)

Except for the “jumpy” attitude in her eye, this beautiful bird looks as if she forages slowly on the ground.

Silver-eared mesias (Leiothrix argentauris) are native to Southeast Asia where they live in the forest eating insects and fruit.

DNA testing recently re-classed them into new family (Leiothrichidae) and genus names (Leiothrix instead of Mesia), so it’s confusing when you look them up.  The books are hopelessly out of date and the Internet has both names.

At this link to an old name, Mesia argentauris, you’ll find videos, photos and sounds.  The birds are so fast-moving that some of the videos are posted in slow motion!  Even when standing still, silver-eared mesias rapidly flick their wings and tails.  Click here to see a male foraging at a feeding station.  Wow!

This female was photographed in Mae Wong National Park in Nakhon Sawan, Thailand.  After you’ve seen them move, you realize how hard it was to capture this sharp photo.

 

(this photo is a Featured Picture on Wikimedia Commons.  Click on the image to see the original.)

No responses yet

Nov 27 2014

Wild Turkeys Waltz

Wild turkeys waltz (screenshot from YouTube video)

 

Today while we enjoy the domesticated bird the wild turkeys dance.

Happy Thanksgiving.

 

(Click on the screenshot to view the video on YouTube)

 

No responses yet

Nov 22 2014

Shorebird Of The Savannah

Published by under Beyond Bounds

Spotted thick-knee, South Africa (photo by Cris Hamilton)

He looks like a shorebird, doesn’t he?  But you won’t find him in North America.

This is a spotted or Cape thick-knee (Burhinus capensis), a nocturnal(!) bird who lives in the tall grass of the African savannah.

Cris Hamilton photographed this one in the Serengeti in eastern Africa.

If you don’t want to travel that far you can see him at the National Aviary.

 

(photo by Cris Hamilton)

2 responses so far

Oct 26 2014

Ugly But Beautiful

Published by under Beyond Bounds

King Vulture at  Weltvogelpark Walsrode, Germany (photo from Wikimedia Commons)

From a distance the king vulture (Sarcoramphus papa) of Central and South America looks simply black and white but up close his naked head is amazing.

That’s his skin that’s so colorful — yellow, orange, red, blue, gray and purple.

Ugly but beautiful.

 

(This featured photo on Wikimedia Commons (Creative Commons license) was taken at Weltvogelpark Walsrode in Germany.  Click on the image to see the original)

No responses yet

Oct 10 2014

Click On Every Penguin

Penguin Watch: count the penguins (image from Zooniverse Penguin Watch)

Are you hooked on penguins? Would you like to see more of them from the comfort of your home?

Check out the new online citizen science project, Penguin Watch, where you can view more than 175,000 photos of Antarctic penguins, chicks and eggs.

Because penguins are declining, scientists are monitoring them using remote cameras.  The cameras have taken a lot of pictures — so many that the task of counting the penguins and their breeding success is impossible for the few scientists involved.  That’s where citizen science comes in.

Zooniverse put the photos online and made an easy tool for counting the penguins.  Look at the photo.  Click on every penguin. Done!  The clicks become a crowd-sourced map of Antarctica’s penguins.

It doesn’t matter if you make mistakes because crowd-sourcing smooths out the errors. You can even chat about the images with other volunteers and the researchers at Penguin Watch Talk.

Help scientists understand why penguin populations are declining and how to protect them by visiting www.penguinwatch.org or these links on Facebook and Twitter.

Look at the photos.  Click on every penguin.  That’s all you have to do.

 

(remote camera photo of penguins in Antarctica from Zooniverse Penguin Watch.  How many do you see?)

No responses yet

Oct 08 2014

Gallinule On Steroids

Purple swamp Hen at Wollongong botanic gardens (photo by Toby Hudson)

Have you ever seen this bird?

It resembles a purple gallinule (Porphyrio martinicus) but it’s the size of a chicken with darker plumage and scary-looking feet.  It looks like a gallinule on steroids.

This is, in fact, a purple swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio), native to Africa, tropical Asia, Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand, but you don’t have to travel that far to see one.

I learned in an ABA article by Bill Pranty that purple swamphens mysteriously appeared at the Silverlakes development in Pembroke Pines, Florida in 1996.  Some speculated that the birds had escaped from Miami MetroZoo during Hurricane Andrew four years earlier, but the zoo hadn’t lost any swamphens.  Closer inspection revealed that two breeders a quarter mile from Silverlakes had allowed their purple swamphens to roam free.  Naturally some of the swamphens didn’t come home.

By October 2006 purple swamphens were so prolific that Florida’s wildlife managers decided to eradicate them, but more than two years of shooting had no effect.  The swamphens continued to expand their range.  The failed eradication program ended in December 2008.

The first time I ever saw a purple swamphen was last December at Green Cay Wetlands in Boynton Beach, Florida, about 40 air-miles from their original release point.  I’ve birded in Palm Beach County numerous times since the swamphen’s release — especially at Wakodahatchee Wetlands where they appeared in 2000 — but it took 20 years for me to see one.

Though the bird was added to the official ABA Checklist in February 2013, their reputation is tarnished.  When I pointed out my new Life Bird to another birder standing nearby she said, “They aren’t a good thing to see.”

Read about the purple swamphen’s history, the unsuccessful attempt to eradicate them, and their expansion in Florida in this article by Bill Pranty.

 

(photo from Australia via from Wikimedia Commons. Click on the image to see the original)

2 responses so far

Next »

Bird Stories from OnQ