Dec 26 2012

Go on a Virtual Safari, Help Science

Published by at 5:45 am under Beyond Bounds,Mammals

Nature observers and webcam lovers, here’s an opportunity to go on a virtual safari and contribute to science from the comfort of your home.

The University of Minnesota has been studying lions in Africa’s Serengeti for over 45 years.  Several years ago, in an effort to determine the population of other species in lion country, they installed 225 motion-detection cameras to record all the animals, both day and night, that pass by the study sites.

They now have thousands and thousands of photographs that contain an animal of interest … but which animal?   And how many?  And what are they doing?  Are there Wildebeest? Zebras? Serval cats?  Eland?  Guinea fowl? Grant’s gazelles (above)?

The task of identifying and counting the animals in so many photos was too huge for just a few people so they teemed up with Zooniverse to launch the Snapshot Serengeti website. It’s a citizen science project and you can help.

Visit snapshotserengeti.org to see the photos.  Try the tutorial. Learn how to identify the animals and how to use the clues for animals you’ve never seen before.  Then checkmark three items: what species, how many, what they’re doing.  Click Finish and you’re onto the next photo.

Of the two Zooniverse projects I’ve tried so far I like this the best.  At first I wasn’t very good at wildebeest vs. eland vs. buffalo but I quickly got better.  I could really tell I’m a “bird person” when I was excited to see two guinea fowl, and then a secretary bird!

Try it yourself.  Sign up at www.snapshotserengeti.org, sign in and you’re off on safari!

(screenshot from Snapshot Serengeti)

One response so far

One Response to “Go on a Virtual Safari, Help Science”

  1. Bill Parkeron 26 Dec 2012 at 10:33 am

    What a neat way to do your homework if you are planning on going on an African Safari! It should be a lot better than just thumbing through a fieldguide and looking at the pictures.

Comments RSS

Leave a Reply

Bird Stories from OnQ