Jul 26 2012

Migration Has Already Begun

Published by at 7:20 am under Books & Events,Migration,Water and Shore

It’s still summer — especially today with a forecast heat index of 100oF — but fall migration has already begun.

Shorebirds are on the move and this year we may see some rarities in land-locked western Pennsylvania because the drought has lowered water levels and exposed many mud flats.

Last Sunday Shawn Collins saw sanderlings at Tamarack Lake in Crawford County and on Tuesday five American avocets were a one-day-wonder at Yellow Creek State Park in Indiana County.

Check the edges of local lakes and you’ll likely find killdeer, sandpiper “peeps,” spotted sandpipers, solitary sandpipers, and lesser yellowlegs.  If you’re lucky you’ll find a surpise like the avocet pictured above.

And if thunderstorms or heat force you indoors, stop by Steve Gosser’s exhibit at Penn State’s New Kensington campus to see beautiful photographs of birds.

Steve’s one-man show, My Feathered Friends – Bird Portraits, runs through Friday, July 27.  This is your last chance to see it.   Click here for directions.

(photo by Steve Gosser)

3 responses so far

3 Responses to “Migration Has Already Begun”

  1. Marcy Con 26 Jul 2012 at 4:16 pm

    How about an Avocet? Missed them since we didn’t have enough time to get to YC and back home in time for Dana’s caregiver to get home…We did see them years back at YC.

  2. Steve Gosseron 27 Jul 2012 at 1:20 pm

    Unfortunately there was a bit of a goof up on when my exhibit was coming down. Originally it was set for Sunday July 29th but I was just informed that another exhibit is being set up tomorrow July 28th. So I’m taking it down this evening (7/27). The gallery director there told me they would love for me to do another exhibit there next year, so there will be more opportunities in the future to see my work if you haven’t and would like to.

  3. Kate St. Johnon 27 Jul 2012 at 1:26 pm

    Oh no! I had planned to come over tomorrow. :-(

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