Oct 17 2010

Coming Soon

Published by at 7:46 am under Migration,Songbirds


If you didn’t have dark-eyed juncos in your neighborhood all summer, don’t worry they’re on their way.

Juncos breed in Canada and the mountainous parts of the United States.  In October and November they move south or to lower elevations, but not far because they prefer cool climates.  Some of them spend the winter in Pittsburgh. 

I’m looking forward to their arrival in Schenley Park because “I like their clean little coveralls” (as William Stafford said in his poem Juncos). 

Soon, soon, within a month they’ll be here.

(photo by Bobby Greene)

7 responses so far

7 Responses to “Coming Soon”

  1. Patsyon 17 Oct 2010 at 8:14 am

    Love these little guys too. Unfortunately, however, it is a sign of colder weather being on the way.

  2. Marianneon 17 Oct 2010 at 9:10 am

    They showed up at my place on 10-14-10! They were all excited and chasing each other through the shrubs!

  3. Harrietton 17 Oct 2010 at 10:38 am

    I’m 60 miles north of Pittsburgh. Mine came on Thursday the 14th. So, Kate, they are on their way!!! The same day my Red Breasted Nuthatch also came.

  4. Doughburyon 17 Oct 2010 at 10:44 am

    I saw a junco in Greensburg on Wednesday morning. He even did his little scratch-dance for me.

  5. Marianneon 18 Oct 2010 at 4:43 am

    I should have mentioned that I am 100 miles northeast of Pittsburgh.

  6. Kathyon 18 Oct 2010 at 4:31 pm

    I used to love to watch these little guys from my kitchen window, years ago when I lived in Ontario NY. I had several bird feeders out back with 4 acres of woods behind them. I would get these guys, wood peckers, chickadees, nuthatches, cardinals. How does the song go? “Those were the days my friend.”

  7. Margeon 20 Oct 2010 at 9:40 pm

    Love to see them when there’s a touch of snow on the ground or if they’re sitting on the edge of a pine branch with a touch of snow…a few have come to Crooked Creek, don’t have any in my yard yet–soon, tho’.

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