Apr 30 2009

Bad Hair Day

Published by at 5:04 pm under Peregrines

Peregrine Falcon, E2, at University of Pittsburgh nest (photo from National Aviary webcam)

It’s been raining off and on today and poured buckets for a while this afternoon. 

When I pulled this picture from the motion detection server it made me laugh out loud.  I don’t know where E2 was perched in the rain but his head certainly got wet!

(photo from the National Aviary webcam at the University of Pittsburgh)

6 responses so far

6 Responses to “Bad Hair Day”

  1. Johnon 30 Apr 2009 at 11:03 pm

    Poor E2. He’ll have to take it out on some pigeons. :-)

  2. Dianeon 01 May 2009 at 7:50 am

    For me, this is what it is all about. I love watching them but not getting too bent about the number of hatches. We’ll all know in time! To be able to watch them interact and care for their family is the greatest privilege.

  3. Joannon 01 May 2009 at 2:04 pm

    How long after the chicks hatch do they get tagged?

  4. Kate St. Johnon 01 May 2009 at 3:08 pm

    They are banded when they are adult size but do not yet have their flight feathers. This is between 25 and 30 days after hatching. On average, the bandings have occurred on the 27th day after hatching.

  5. Laurenon 01 May 2009 at 6:36 pm

    Gulf Tower chicks got fed, and there may be three chicks…It’s difficult to tell due to the blurry camera. There is a big, aggressive chick, so he may just be taking up a lot of space…But I thought I saw three distinct backs..

  6. Tracion 03 May 2009 at 6:26 pm

    Holy Moly – I just checked the COL and it looks like a bird exploded over there!!
    I can only imagine what it will look like by the time those chicks are ready to fledge!!

    I also just checked the Gulf Tower – I saw two chicks and an egg is now in the foreground. I think she’s done with just the two by now?? Didn’t kate say she sits for around 8 days after the first hatches? I think its past that now? I’m anxious for her to actually move around more – so we can see the two chicks!!

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